Station Point

Crafting Tune Artifacts

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Spotify Artist Verification

Posted on | January 3, 2020 | No Comments

Hi, my name is J.D. Northrup and my con­tact email is info@stationpointmusic.com. Cheers!

Resonant Frequencies Vol. One

Posted on | December 8, 2018 | No Comments

Sup­port local music and check out my new track “Dis­in­te­grate Me Gen­tly” on The Res­o­nant Fre­quen­cies Elec­tron­ic Open Mic’s first artist com­pi­la­tion!

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12 artists, 12 unre­leased tracks. 12 dol­lars plus 5 ship­ping. The Res­o­nant Fre­quen­cies Com­pi­la­tion. Pay­Pal theresfreq@Gmail.com Mas­tered by @n4th4nm00dy art­work by @dirty_bill

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Opaque Ocean (Live Sketch)

Posted on | December 4, 2018 | No Comments

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Inten­tion sketch. #mod­u­larsynth #tech­no #theres­freq #bayarea

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Elements EP

Posted on | November 22, 2018 | No Comments


After 13 years col­lect­ing vir­tu­al dust on my hard dri­ve, I’m grate­ful to be releas­ing this EP for free on Band­camp. Please down­load, share, and let me know what you think!

Most Common Keys For House and Deep Tech Music

Posted on | March 6, 2018 | No Comments

In an attempt to get my tracks to sound more like the tunes I like to DJ, I ran across an arti­cle about how club sub fre­q’s can range down to about 40Hz, which is just below the note E1.

Note Hz
C1 32.7
D1 36.7
E1 41.2
F1 43.7
G1 49.0
A1 55.0

The arti­cle (wish I could find it again) men­tioned that’s why a bunch of tracks are in F and G — because those root bass notes fall com­fort­ably in the range that can be played back. A low F1 note is prob­a­bly one of those tones that sounds KILLER on a good rig.

Look­ing at some of my favorite house, tech­no, and deep tech tracks from 2017, I noticed that most are in F, Bb, Eb, G, or C. I’m not sure my analy­sis soft­ware (djay Pro 2) is dis­cern­ing major vs minor here.

But check out the cir­cle of fifths:

(By Just plain Bill — Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4463183)

… those keys are all clus­tered in the upper-left cor­ner, which means that they will be easy to tran­si­tion to dur­ing a set because jumps to neigh­bor­ing keys in the cir­cle of fifths sound good.

Now inter­est­ing­ly, this guy’s analy­sis of the Beat­port Top 100 Tracks showed a dif­fer­ent set of pop­u­lar keys — but I don’t play tracks as “Pop”-y as the Top 100. Who knows.

 

Mid-Side Spatialization Patch

Posted on | December 24, 2015 | No Comments

This is a mid-side stereo patch explor­ing ways of spread­ing the var­i­ous out­puts from the DPO around the stereo field. The DPO sends 6 wave­forms to the RxMx. The low­er-num­bered RxMx chan­nels are fed fun­da­men­tals, and become the “mid” sig­nal. The high­er chan­nels have increas­ing­ly spec­tral­ly-rich oscil­la­tors, and become the “side” sig­nal.

The first clip has some reverb, ping-pong delay and drums added. The sec­ond clip is the raw patch:

Mid-side decod­ing is:
L = M + S
R = M — S

Maths is used to invert the “Side” sig­nal and sub­tract it from “Mid”. The Optomix is used to add these two togeth­er. That way, we have the L and R sig­nals.

I’m fil­ter­ing the Side sig­nal via the MMG, which allows for fil­ter­sweeps that only hap­pen in stereo. It’s also a good idea to scoop out the fre­quen­cy range occu­pied by the Mid sig­nal with a high­pass so the decod­ed sound isn’t as hol­low. One of the many beau­ties of MS encod­ing is you can do stereo fil­ter­ing (of sorts), using mono fil­ters / effects.

One inter­est­ing part is cal­i­brat­ing the lev­els of chan­nels 2 and 3 on Maths to get the bal­ance right. Set the RxMx chan­nel and radi­ate con­trols so you only hear chan­nel 1. This should be pure “Mid”. Adjust Maths Ch 2 so that the L and R out­puts are the same lev­el. Next, set the RxMx so you only hear chan­nel 6 — this should be pure “Side”. Adjust Ch 3 on Maths in the neg­a­tive until the L and R chan­nels have a rough­ly equal lev­el. The sound should be com­plete­ly phase-invert­ed from left to right.

Now, set­ting chan­nel and radi­ate should mix between mono and stereo imag­ing, with the high­er har­mon­ics appear­ing main­ly in the stereo field. Things can get pret­ty nuts of you tune Oscil­la­tor A and B to dif­fer­ent fre­quen­cies.

Click for full size

Click for full size

Ouroboros — Shared System Series

Posted on | November 17, 2014 | No Comments

I got a mod­u­lar piece accept­ed on the Make Noise Records “Shared Sys­tem Series” com­pi­la­tion today! The series is intend­ed to show­case artists using the MakeNoise SharedSys­tem rig to make a live com­po­si­tion, with no over­dubs and no exter­nal effects (except an option­al reverb).

Here’s my piece:

Here’s the patch:
http://www.modulargrid.net/e/patches/view/9225

And check out the whole playlist here:

Night EP

Posted on | April 6, 2014 | No Comments

HD038-Layout_02

Out now on Beat­port via Har­mo­nious Dis­cord Record­ings, fea­tur­ing remix­es by Evan Marc (aka Bluetech) and Patchen Pre­ston. Art­work by ellisett.

1) Aeo­lian Intro
2) C5
3) C5 (Patchen’s Yel­low Fever Mix)
4) Night Groove (Orig­i­nal Mix)
5) Night Groove (Bluetech Remix)
6) D13
7) Talk Is Cheap

http://www.beatport.com/release/night-ep/1241604

Wogglebug + DPO as White Noise Source

Posted on | April 6, 2014 | No Comments

So I recent­ly got a MakeNoise SharedSys­tem mod­u­lar rig, and one thing miss­ing from it was an appar­ent lack of the abil­i­ty to make… noise. White noise.

How­ev­er, by push­ing the Wog­gle­bug and the DPO’s inter­nal mod­u­la­tion rout­ing to the extreme, you can get some decent-sound­ing white noise. Basi­cal­ly, you turn most of the knobs on both mod­ules all the way clock­wise and lis­ten to the DPO final out­put.

Click for full image

Click for full image

Here’s how it sounds, going through an MMG for fil­ter sweeps and the Echophon for some delay:

FX Halos in Ableton Live

Posted on | February 29, 2012 | No Comments

This is a very sim­ple trick to do, but not so obvi­ous to fig­ure out that it’s even pos­si­ble.  The idea is to sidechain com­press the pro­cess­ing on a Return bus by its own input sig­nal, in order to clear out some “emp­ty” space around the dry sig­nal. It’s like mak­ing a “breath­ing fx bus”.

For exam­ple, if you have a stac­ca­to vocal sam­ple being sent into a reverb or a delay, using this trick the effect tails will “swell in” over time after the dry sig­nal stops.  It’s sim­i­lar to kick sidechain­ing.

Here’s an exam­ple with­out a halo:

fxNo­Ha­lo

Now with:

fxHa­lo

That’s not the most inspir­ing demo, but this can sound very organ­ic, and helps clear space in a full mix.  To set up in Live:

  • Send sound from an Audio track to a Return track.
  • On the Return track, add a plu­g­in that cre­ates a tem­po­ral tail: ie reverb or delay.
  • Add a com­pres­sor after the fx.
  • Enable Sidechain, and set the Audio From drop­down to the same Return track you’re on.
  • Set the Audio From posi­tion to “Pre FX” in order to sidechain from the dry sig­nal.
  • Set up your thresh­old, release, ratio etc. to get your desired “halo” pump­ing sound around the input sig­nal.

This can be a real­ly nice way to get some breathy flut­ter­ing organ­ic motion in a net­work of Return tracks that might even be cross-send­ing sig­nal to each oth­er in a feed­back net­work…

Click for full-size

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