Station Point

Crafting Tune Artifacts

Recent Posts:

Resonant Frequencies Vol. One

Posted on | December 8, 2018 | No Comments

Sup­port local music and check out my new track “Dis­in­te­grate Me Gen­tly” on The Res­o­nant Fre­quen­cies Elec­tron­ic Open Mic’s first artist com­pi­la­tion!

View this post on Insta­gram

12 artists, 12 unre­leased tracks. 12 dol­lars plus 5 ship­ping. The Res­o­nant Fre­quen­cies Com­pi­la­tion. Pay­Pal theresfreq@Gmail.com Mas­tered by @n4th4nm00dy art­work by @dirty_bill

A post shared by The Res­o­nant Fre­quen­cies (@theresfreq) on

Opaque Ocean (Live Sketch)

Posted on | December 4, 2018 | No Comments

View this post on Insta­gram

Inten­tion sketch. #mod­u­larsynth #tech­no #theres­freq #bayarea

A post shared by jdn (Sta­tion Point) (@jdn_stationpoint) on

Elements EP

Posted on | November 22, 2018 | No Comments


After 13 years col­lect­ing vir­tu­al dust on my hard dri­ve, I’m grate­ful to be releas­ing this EP for free on Band­camp. Please down­load, share, and let me know what you think!

Most Common Keys For House and Deep Tech Music

Posted on | March 6, 2018 | No Comments

In an attempt to get my tracks to sound more like the tunes I like to DJ, I ran across an arti­cle about how club sub freq’s can range down to about 40Hz, which is just below the note E1.

Note Hz
C1 32.7
D1 36.7
E1 41.2
F1 43.7
G1 49.0
A1 55.0

The arti­cle (wish I could find it again) men­tioned that’s why a bunch of tracks are in F and G — because those root bass notes fall com­fort­ably in the range that can be played back. A low F1 note is prob­a­bly one of those tones that sounds KILLER on a good rig.

Look­ing at some of my favorite house, tech­no, and deep tech tracks from 2017, I noticed that most are in F, Bb, Eb, G, or C. I’m not sure my analy­sis soft­ware (djay Pro 2) is dis­cern­ing major vs minor here.

But check out the cir­cle of fifths:

(By Just plain Bill — Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4463183)

… those keys are all clus­tered in the upper-left cor­ner, which means that they will be easy to tran­si­tion to dur­ing a set because jumps to neigh­bor­ing keys in the cir­cle of fifths sound good.

Now inter­est­ing­ly, this guy’s analy­sis of the Beat­port Top 100 Tracks showed a dif­fer­ent set of pop­u­lar keys — but I don’t play tracks as “Pop”-y as the Top 100. Who knows.

 

Mid-Side Spatialization Patch

Posted on | December 24, 2015 | No Comments

This is a mid-side stereo patch explor­ing ways of spread­ing the var­i­ous out­puts from the DPO around the stereo field. The DPO sends 6 wave­forms to the RxMx. The low­er-num­bered RxMx chan­nels are fed fun­da­men­tals, and become the “mid” sig­nal. The high­er chan­nels have increas­ing­ly spec­tral­ly-rich oscil­la­tors, and become the “side” sig­nal.

The first clip has some reverb, ping-pong delay and drums added. The sec­ond clip is the raw patch:

Mid-side decod­ing is:
L = M + S
R = M — S

Maths is used to invert the “Side” sig­nal and sub­tract it from “Mid”. The Optomix is used to add these two togeth­er. That way, we have the L and R sig­nals.

I’m fil­ter­ing the Side sig­nal via the MMG, which allows for fil­ter­sweeps that only hap­pen in stereo. It’s also a good idea to scoop out the fre­quen­cy range occu­pied by the Mid sig­nal with a high­pass so the decod­ed sound isn’t as hol­low. One of the many beau­ties of MS encod­ing is you can do stereo fil­ter­ing (of sorts), using mono fil­ters / effects.

One inter­est­ing part is cal­i­brat­ing the lev­els of chan­nels 2 and 3 on Maths to get the bal­ance right. Set the RxMx chan­nel and radi­ate con­trols so you only hear chan­nel 1. This should be pure “Mid”. Adjust Maths Ch 2 so that the L and R out­puts are the same lev­el. Next, set the RxMx so you only hear chan­nel 6 — this should be pure “Side”. Adjust Ch 3 on Maths in the neg­a­tive until the L and R chan­nels have a rough­ly equal lev­el. The sound should be com­plete­ly phase-invert­ed from left to right.

Now, set­ting chan­nel and radi­ate should mix between mono and stereo imag­ing, with the high­er har­mon­ics appear­ing main­ly in the stereo field. Things can get pret­ty nuts of you tune Oscil­la­tor A and B to dif­fer­ent fre­quen­cies.

Click for full size

Click for full size

Ouroboros — Shared System Series

Posted on | November 17, 2014 | No Comments

I got a mod­u­lar piece accept­ed on the Make Noise Records “Shared Sys­tem Series” com­pi­la­tion today! The series is intend­ed to show­case artists using the MakeNoise SharedSys­tem rig to make a live com­po­si­tion, with no over­dubs and no exter­nal effects (except an option­al reverb).

Here’s my piece:

Here’s the patch:
http://www.modulargrid.net/e/patches/view/9225

And check out the whole playlist here:

Night EP

Posted on | April 6, 2014 | No Comments

HD038-Layout_02

Out now on Beat­port via Har­mo­nious Dis­cord Record­ings, fea­tur­ing remix­es by Evan Marc (aka Bluetech) and Patchen Pre­ston. Art­work by ellisett.

1) Aeo­lian Intro
2) C5
3) C5 (Patchen’s Yel­low Fever Mix)
4) Night Groove (Orig­i­nal Mix)
5) Night Groove (Bluetech Remix)
6) D13
7) Talk Is Cheap

http://www.beatport.com/release/night-ep/1241604

Wogglebug + DPO as White Noise Source

Posted on | April 6, 2014 | No Comments

So I recent­ly got a MakeNoise SharedSys­tem mod­u­lar rig, and one thing miss­ing from it was an appar­ent lack of the abil­i­ty to make… noise. White noise.

How­ev­er, by push­ing the Wog­gle­bug and the DPO’s inter­nal mod­u­la­tion rout­ing to the extreme, you can get some decent-sound­ing white noise. Basi­cal­ly, you turn most of the knobs on both mod­ules all the way clock­wise and lis­ten to the DPO final out­put.

Click for full image

Click for full image

Here’s how it sounds, going through an MMG for fil­ter sweeps and the Echophon for some delay:

FX Halos in Ableton Live

Posted on | February 29, 2012 | No Comments

This is a very sim­ple trick to do, but not so obvi­ous to fig­ure out that it’s even pos­si­ble.  The idea is to sidechain com­press the pro­cess­ing on a Return bus by its own input sig­nal, in order to clear out some “emp­ty” space around the dry sig­nal. It’s like mak­ing a “breath­ing fx bus”.

For exam­ple, if you have a stac­ca­to vocal sam­ple being sent into a reverb or a delay, using this trick the effect tails will “swell in” over time after the dry sig­nal stops.  It’s sim­i­lar to kick sidechain­ing.

Here’s an exam­ple with­out a halo:

fxNo­Ha­lo

Now with:

fxHa­lo

That’s not the most inspir­ing demo, but this can sound very organ­ic, and helps clear space in a full mix.  To set up in Live:

  • Send sound from an Audio track to a Return track.
  • On the Return track, add a plu­g­in that cre­ates a tem­po­ral tail: ie reverb or delay.
  • Add a com­pres­sor after the fx.
  • Enable Sidechain, and set the Audio From drop­down to the same Return track you’re on.
  • Set the Audio From posi­tion to “Pre FX” in order to sidechain from the dry sig­nal.
  • Set up your thresh­old, release, ratio etc. to get your desired “halo” pump­ing sound around the input sig­nal.

This can be a real­ly nice way to get some breathy flut­ter­ing organ­ic motion in a net­work of Return tracks that might even be cross-send­ing sig­nal to each oth­er in a feed­back net­work…

Click for full-size

MiniCommand, Machinedrum, and OS X

Posted on | May 11, 2011 | No Comments

So I’ve had a Ruin & Wesen Mini­Com­mand for a lit­tle under a year, but haven’t been using it as much as I would like because it didn’t inte­grate well with my set­up — until last night.

The stan­dard way to use the Mini­Com­mand is to con­nect it in a closed MIDI loop with the device in ques­tion — which makes it hard use in a com­put­er-based MIDI set­up with a sequencer. There are ways around this, eg. daisy-chain­ing the Mini­Com­mand between the computer’s MIDI inter­face and the device you want to con­trol, but I have found that this intro­duces some small tim­ing delays (enough to dri­ve me crazy).

Read more

keep looking »